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Image for Big Day Out @ Gold Coast Parklands, 20/01/2008

Big Day Out @ Gold CoastParklands, 20/01/2008

To check out the photo gallery from the Gold Coast Big Day Out click HERE.

South East Queensland has been enjoying unprecedented rainfall over the past few weeks, and the day of the Gold Coast Big Day Out dawned overcast and humid. Luckily it only rained briefly, certainly not enough to dampen anyone’s spirit. While a large number of acts seemed to have political overtones, this year’s Big Day Out had something for everyone, from the angry rock of Rage Against The Machine and Anti-Flag, the charming pop of Operator Please and Kate Nash, and the mod-rock of Faker and Yves Klein Blue.

8 piece musical collective The Gin Club open the days festivities, having been promoted to the Green Stage after a strong showing on the Local Produce stage last year (or possibly just due to lack of room on the smaller LP stage). Whatever the case, the Gin Club take full advantage, rocking up some of their new alt-country/blues songs to suit the festival vibe. With 8 members (ringleader Ben Salter boasts early on, “I bet we’re the only band at the Big Day Out with five drummers!), they have to change instruments frequently, but practise has made the process as smooth as silk, and they suffer none of the sound problems that can often plague the early bands. Theres a swelling intensity to their set, which bodes well for the rest of the day to come, not to mention the new album Junk, due to drop in March.

Something With Numbers meanwhile are opening the main stages with some more straightforward rock. Jake Grigg is in fine form with his vocals, moving around the stage with vigor, although he picks up an acoustic for some quieter numbers too. However the band is definitely at their best when he is unencumbered by a guitar, and free to move around the stage, drawing energy from the fledgling crowd that has gathered in front of the twin stages. They close with hit single Apple Of The Eye (Lay Me Down), which gets a cheer and some singing along from the crowd.

Operator Please had a massive 2007, with their debut album Yes Yes Vindictive landing on many critics top ten lists. They kick off 2008 in impressive style, opening with Get What You Want as the rain begins to pelt down – diehard fans don’t move, but a fair few people head for the tents. The band flow through their pop-rock tunes with their usual aplomb, until Amandah asks someone to hold up a sign. The rest of us haven’t seen it, but the camera finds it in due course, and its rather harsh message “Operator Please shut the f*** up!” Amandah launches a scathing attack, asking anyone who sees this clown to “twist his nuts”, and she gets a cheer from the crowd. It’s a bizarre moment that recalls the Lisa Simpson quote, “Why would they come to our concert just to boo us?”. Luckily the rest of the set passes without incident, and although the rain has put a dampener on things, the big one-two finish of Just A Song About Ping Pong and Zero Zero send the fans away with some happy memories.

British India, meanwhile, have found themselves in an unusual position. When everyone wanted to get out of the driving rain, the big top on the Green Stage was the first logical place to head. As a result, the tent is full to the rafters for British India, and they reward the random entry of the crowd with a fantastic set of momentum-charged rock songs. Frontman Declan Melia feeds off the energy in the extremely humid tent to deliver his vocals with near-savage verocity. Tie Up My Hands and new radio single Russian Roulette get the whole crowd cheering along, and they finish with breakthrough single Black and White Radio, but not before Melia thanks the crowd for supporting Australian music in an international festival. It’s a heartfelt thanks, and it’s returned in kind.

Punk rock icons Anti-Flag deserved better than their early spot on the main stages, but it doesn’t faze them in the slightest, as they attack their set with ruthless abandon. Bassist Chris Barker (aka Chris #2) does most of the talking between songs, decrying the U.S. government and various other things, while calling for unity from the crowd, who are happy to oblige, provided unity means moshing. The music is straight up angry punk, delivered with authority by the punk veterans, and when Barker calls for a circle pit before I’d Tell You But I’m Dead, he gets it. Turncoat also has the crowd singing along (after being prompted) and it’s a weary mosh pit by the time the set draws to an end. Anti-Flag are the first of many political acts over the course of the day, and they’ve set the bar pretty high.

Faker, meanwhile, are anything but political, bringing their mod-infused rock to the crowd at the main stages. Unfortunately, without the big tops of the other stages, bands have to work that much harder to generate energy, and Faker have trouble connecting to the crowd outside of the centre D. However, it’s impossible to ignore hit singles Quarter To Three and Hurricane, and This Heart Attack sounds even better live, delivered with all the passion Nathan Hudson can muster. He even heads up to the top of the speaker stack, throwing himself off to complete the bridge of Hurricane, and the crowd can’t help but be impressed with his vigor. Faker’s work has found some new fans today.

In solo mode, Josh Pyke’s songs can feel a little samey, but luckily today he’s brought along the full band – another act to take advantage of the festival atmosphere in the Green Stage. It’s his first Gold Coast Big Day Out so he takes a photo in between playing some of the hit singles from his Memories and Dust album such as Lines On Palms and the title track. His guitarist even brings out the violin for Buttons, and after a set this good, even some of the crowd wearing darkest of the dark Rage Against The Machine shirts are tapping their feet and nodding along – Pyke’s positive vibe is just that infectious.

Kate Nash may come across as a pop princess in her music videos, but one look at her behind the piano (not to mention the occasionaly coarse language) is enough to convince anyone that she has some musical talent going on. She just happens to like playing pop songs. Nash has an undeniably cute charm about her, even as she pounds the keys, especially on her last two songs – Foundations gets a huge cheer, and new single Pumpkin Soup has been rocked up a little, once again to suit the festival atmosphere. The bridge from Pumpkin Soup even has large sections of the crowd bouncing, to Nash’s great delight, and she rounds out the number by thrashing up and down the length of her piano.

Gyroscope become the fourth act in a row to put on an absolutely tops set under the big top at the Green Stage. It doesn’t hurt that their big singles combine fast, heavy rock with some punchy riffs. Beware Wolf and Fast Girl are great openers for the set, and get a huge mosh pit going. The guitar levels are a little off, but that doesn’t stop the crowd from rocking out. Like the Gin Club, these Perth rockers have a new album due in March, and they follow up new song 1981 with Dream Vs Scream, and then Safe Forever, which gets a huge cheer, as well as some singing along. The new songs sound fairly similar to the classic Gyroscope we’ve come to know and love, which is good news for fans. Frontman Daniel Sanders gets wrapped up in the music, hurling himself around the stage, but drummer Rob Nassif keeps the whole thing together, driving forward the songs at high speed. Doctor Doctor gets another huge cheer, and by this stage, everything the boys do is gold, and, closing the set with Snakeskin, Gyroscope have cemented themselves a spot in the top acts of the day.

Regurgitator make the best fashion choice of the day, with all the members decked out in white (although the big sunglasses suggest they might be making a jab at pop culture too.) Early numbers Blood and Spunk and My Friend The Robot capture the attention of the crowd, but old songs Everyday Formula and Track One don’t have the same punch that they used to. It feels wrong to say it, but Regurgitator packed more of a punch when they were just a two piece, with drums by the computers. Still, rocked out versions of I Will Lick Your Asshole and Polyester Girl hit the mark, while Quan Yeomans segues from the ending of Black Bugs into the familiar opening riff of Sweet Child Of Mine. Kung Foo Sing and FSO are great trips down memory lane for us mid-90s rock fans (and lets face it, with Rage Against The Machine headlining, there’s plenty of us to go around)

Spoon take on the now fabled Green Stage, and unfortunately the magic can’t quite carry them all the way. Their set focuses mainly on more recent material, especially from the critically acclaimed Ga Ga Ga Ga Ga, but over the course of the set, a lot of the songs start to sound too similar. Stay Don’t Go is a highlight, as is Don’t Make Me A Target, and although Britt Daniel is a charismatic frontman, there’s just not enough energy coming off the stage.

Yves Klein Blue sieze their opportunity on the Local Produce stage, in front of an impressive-sized crowd. Frontman Michael Tomlinson is drenched in sweat, with the humid conditions really showing. Still, he and the rest of the band get the crowd moving with their dancey-rock. It’s the lead guitarist who shines over the course of the set, with excellent work on both guitar and piano bolstering the set. Polka song gets even the most recalcitrant audience member tapping their toes in time.

Tom Morello released a solo album as his side project Nightwatchman last year, and he jumped at the opportunity to strut his stuff on the Big Day Out tour. Morello might not have the greatest voice, and his lyrics have all the subtlety of a sledgehammer, but his strident personal views shine forward with every perfectly plucked note. He has a superstar quality that draws attention to him, and it never feels like preaching when he tells stories about political inequality and protest in between songs. He finishes with The Road I Must Travel, a road song of the highest order, and he whips up a passion in the crowd so that even singing along feels like an act of protest.

Nearly one year ago to the day Augie March’s One Crowded Hour won them Triple J’s Hottest 100, but their live show hasn’t changed one bit – Glenn Richards is still an absolute perfectionist. Just Passing Through and a rocked up version of Cold Acre set the set on it’s way, before Richards launches straight into One Crowded Hour, sans opening riff. Fairweather fans flood into the middle, sing along, and then stream straight out again at the end. Richards introduces Baron Of Sentiment by talking about it being a Neil-Young-influenced song – “It’s almost as good as one of his really shit songs.” – but the long term fans are used to this self-deprecation, and give him a cheer anyway. Maroondah Reservior doesn’t sound quite right (which Richards acknowledges after it’s finished) but the usual high speed rendition of This Train Will Be Taking No Passengers to close is note perfect, and gets much of the crowd dancing.

At Local Produce Brisbane indie darlings Iron On loose barbed asides at Southern Cross-wearing bogans, fluoro-wearing pill freaks and those pretentious scenesters who wear their pants at half-mast. Luckily, the band’s small but friendly crowd includes none of the above, meaning they escape lynching long enough to deliver a delightful set laced with tracks from new EP The Verse. Showing Signs is an early standout, while Terrible Year sounds even more fuzzy and distorted live. One Man Band is a touch choppy, but the foursome pull it all back into shape at the end with a fine rendition of much-loved oldie More Than Tape complete with impressive rock-out leaps from Ross Hope and Kate Cooper.

Billy Bragg shows that he’s The Nightwatchman’s soulmate with an equally brilliant and politically intense display. Armed only with an electric guitar and his delicious, ever-so-distinctive English accent, he holds a large crowd spellbound with his forthright between-song advocacy and numbers such as I Keep Faith and solidarity poster-song There Is Power In A Union. Way Over Yonder In A Minor Key and Accident Waiting To Happen also help loosen the crowd, and by the time Bragg gets round to his uniquely redrafted version of the Marley classic One Love, the audience is well-primed to help out with the lyrics. He closes out with New England – the slight messiness of it all excused by the crowd’s endearingly enthusiastic theft of the chorus.

In theory, Gin Club should have easily won the “Most Number of Bandmembers” award, but Arcade Fire have them beat with eight regular members as well as two piece brass section and two violin players. Arcade Fire use their numbers to create stunning soundscapes, while the guitar members keep the music firmly tethered to the rock genre. The songs where Win Butler sings are definitely stronger than the ones sung by Régine Chassagne, but each one is still a stunner, especially the brilliant No Cars Go. They even get in on the political action, commenting on American politics. But it’s the music which speaks for itself; Arcade Fire are evidence of chaos theory in music – there’s so much going on at once, it’s hard to pinpoint who is controlling what, but the end result is superb.

Arcade Fire aren’t the only ones dealing in soundscapes – New York experimental buzz-band Battles live up to their billing with one of the performances of the day, fusing the digital precision of electronic music with the analogue messiness of old-fashioned rock in stunning fashion. The quartet construct each song from the ground up, multiple loops of guitars, bass, keys and other electric doo-hickies adding and overlapping with the metronomic drums of John Stanier and the unearthly sing-song pitch bent vocals of Tyondai Braxton. The whole proves far, far greater than the sum of the individual parts, and the crowd just about goes into meltdown as they construct, destruct and reassemble Tonto, Race In and, of course, Atlas from recent release Mirrored. The set feels dreadfully short though – just a taster. Huzzah for sideshows.

Silverchair, on the other hand, have a little trouble holding it together. Songs from their Young Modern album, such as Reflections Of A Sound and Mindreader crackle and pop, but for an unknown reason, Ana’s Song (Open Fire) is drawn out to unnecessary length, and lacks energy. Once it gets dark, they utilise the full light show, but that doesn’t stop If You Keep Losing Sleep devolving into call-and-response for no particular reason. Daniel Johns puts on a fey accent, once again for no discernible reason, and when they close with Freak, it feels like a calculated ploy to appease older fans. It doesn’t help that the originals chunky riffs are lost to feedback.

Brand New’s regular lineup might only feature four members, but that doesn’t stop them bringing out a fifth and sixth touring member on stage to beef up their live sound, most notably in the form of a second drummer. Opening with Sowing Season (Yeah), the U.S. power punk band pack a visceral punch, with front man Jesse Lacey delivering his vocals with intensity. Luca is stunning, as it begins with just Lacey on accoustic, and explodes into it’s five-guitar-propelled finish. The all-too-short set wraps up with a mammoth version of You Won’t Know, which ends with Lacey standing on stage, roaring the title of the song over and over again – a fitting end to a memorable set.

It’s been a long day, but the headliner act is about to make the wait worthwhile. For some of us, the wait hass been even longer, and Rage Against The Machine have a lifetime of expectations to live up to. But, like any legendary band, the main attraction of the day doesn’t just live up to the hype, they smash through it with a raised fist.

They open with the 1-2 punch of Testify and Bulls On Parade. A sea of people is in front of the stage, and the emotion levels are high, with everyone dancing and singing along to almost every word, especially the better-known catch phrases from People Of The Sun and Vietnow. Zach De La Rocha is his usual firey self, while Tom Morello’s guitar work replicating those famous riffs is dazzling. It would be easy to get lost behind those two powerhouses, but drummer Brad Wilk and bassist Tim Commerford are fantastic, leaving their own musical signatures on classic tracks like Bombtrack and Bullet In The Head. The chemistry between the four members is seamless, all evidence of past friction gone, and between Morello’s badged safari-style shirt and peaked cap, and Commerfords unique tattooed look, it’s like these guys never left at all.

Sleep Now In The Fire is delivered as a sermon by Rocha, and he changes the last chorus to “Don’t sleep now in the fire!” as a plea to the crowd, before finishing the main set with War Within A Breath. After a far too long break, they return to play older songs Township Rebellion and Freedom. De La Rocha is covered in sweat, and looks physically exhausted, but he’s still slinging his lines like the veteran that he is. Morello blasts the opening riff from classic Killing In The Name, and from the roar, it’s the song that everyone’s been waiting for. Every word of the iconic song is sung word for word by the crowd, which surely numbers above 20 000 at this stage alone. De La Rocha is able to use the crowd to harmonise in the second chorus, and when they reach the famous ending, all 20 000 people scream out, thrash and dance for one last time. It’s a fevered and passionate way to the end an extremely political Big Day Out, with Rage Against The Machine proving no matter how long you might have been waiting for their return, it’s been worth it.

By Liam McGinniss aka gumbuoy and Stephen Goodwin aka dsthenes

Check out the Gold Coast Big Day Out pics HERE!

Comments

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Demosthenes

Demosthenes said on the 20th Jan, 2008

There is no fucking way in the world I could write a 2,000 word review in four hours, dude. That's a massive effort.

cecbuzz

cecbuzz said on the 20th Jan, 2008

Big Ups Liam or getting this online so quickly for us - and you too leni for uploading pics.
xx
cec

CureMe

CureMe said on the 20th Jan, 2008

I feel like i was there..... that is awesome!

Alexphotosite

Alexphotosite said on the 20th Jan, 2008

Great review guys!

Awww I can't wait to see Arcade Fire tomorrow night! :)

lava

lava said on the 20th Jan, 2008

awesome effort in getting this up so quickly... what a day!

upandatthem

upandatthem said on the 21st Jan, 2008

nice write-up! Hot damn I can't wait for the RATM side-show!

JackT

JackT said on the 21st Jan, 2008

As if I wasn't already insanely jealous of anyone going to BDO, this has deepened the disappointment. Hooray for sideshows!

Johnny Deptran

Johnny Deptran said on the 21st Jan, 2008

The sign writers were just saying what so many of us are thinking. OP, STFU! amen!

gumbuoy

gumbuoy said on the 21st Jan, 2008



Well, Johnny, you're entitled to your opinion, although that opinion might carry more weight if it wasn't written like a tween discovering the internet for the first time.

As for "what so many of us are thinking", we weren't. The people who don't like Operator Please were off seeing someone else. Thats how festivals work.

This was an immature, childish act by one of the many drunken louts that give festivals a bad name. The only thing Amandah did wrong was give these jerks the attention they so richly did not deserve.

gumbuoy

gumbuoy said on the 21st Jan, 2008



I can only imagine how great a show that is going to be. The only downside was that they didn't play No Shelter, which I was kinda hanging out for. But they did play Renegades Of Funk (which I didn't mention in the review), so it's all good :>

Demosthenes

Demosthenes said on the 21st Jan, 2008

Don't understand the hate, man. Embrace music made with passion and delivered with enthusiasm. If it's not your cup of tea, that's cool. It happens. But you ought to be lavishing your praise on the bands you love not wasting your life being thoughtlessly negative (and that's very different to constructive criticism).

Demosthenes

Demosthenes said on the 21st Jan, 2008

Yes. Actually, no. Actually, yes. That section is in the works, you might say. Some of us can't skive off from our day jobs, unfortunately.

NiteShok

NiteShok said on the 21st Jan, 2008

I saw the sign-holding guys parading outside the D before they followed me inside. They were just two guys looking for attention and laughs. Amandah handled it so well. I used to think Operator Please were shit before I saw them live in November. I was converted by their genuine talent and enthusiasm, hence why I made the effort to see them yesterday. Good times, fuck the haters.

Battles were a-fucking-mazing. Can't wait for the Tuesday sideshow.

I was stoked that Rage threw in Vietnow, War Within A Breath and Down Rodeo, a few of their lesser-known songs. The response to Killing In The Name was extraordinary. I was standing between the D and the grandstands, taking in the awesome sights and sounds of 20,000-odd people singing and dancing along to a single song. It was one of the most impressive things I have ever seen. What other song could entirely unite so many people?

BTW, awesome review guys. Congratulations.

libby

libby said on the 21st Jan, 2008

huuuuuge review. Thanks Liam :)

Cant wait for Friday!!!!!

Napoleon Solo

Napoleon Solo said on the 21st Jan, 2008

I wanna take Amandah jogging and if she can handle it, a few squats.

disasterplan

disasterplan said on the 21st Jan, 2008

I really need to know what's in store. REALLY.

Thommo

Thommo said on the 21st Jan, 2008

i know its a little off topic but i cant find any info yet.

Is the entrance to the d barrier back on the side of the D or like it was last year at the back of hte D

leni_t

leni_t said on the 21st Jan, 2008

Back of the D. And apparently a gate that locks when the D is full.

MorningAfterboy

MorningAfterboy said on the 21st Jan, 2008



I'd much rather just hang out with Amandah, because I don't give a shit what she looks like :D

Thommo

Thommo said on the 21st Jan, 2008



yay cause htat worked really well last year for tool and muse... idiots

kyza

kyza said on the 21st Jan, 2008

I'm so glad Silverchair did not get a good review, I was highly disappointed and fucking hated it. They were utter and complete shit trash, Freak was just to get everyone onside.
Bjorks vocals were lost on the hill siders [where i was] music was great no idea what she was singing about.

And a big "you fucking idiot" award goes to the camera man during RATM everyone of Tom's solos did not get filmed, but Zach drinking water during them did, YAY H2O!

kyza

kyza said on the 21st Jan, 2008

I also wanna give MASSIVE props to Leni for putting in at least a 24 hour day! Taking thousands of photos of more than 20+ bands, getting home around midnight and editing her arse off for one hell of a deadline deserves mucho attention.

Gold medal for your efforts fon an exhausting Olympic photography day!

gumbuoy

gumbuoy said on the 21st Jan, 2008

I'm so glad Silverchair did not get a good review, I was highly disappointed and fucking hated it. They were utter and complete shit trash, Freak was just to get everyone onside.
Bjorks vocals were lost on the hill siders [where i was] music was great no idea what she was singing about.

And a big "you fucking idiot" award goes to the camera man during RATM everyone of Tom's solos did not get filmed, but Zach drinking water during them did, YAY H2O!

Yeah, I tried not to be too harsh on Silverchair, I'm not a huge fan, but theyve been known to put on a good show. Not last night tho.

And yeah, whoever was running that camera needs to be shot. Even when Zach was sitting down, drinking water, and POINTING TO TOM MORELLO the camera stayed on him. Nonces.

gumbuoy

gumbuoy said on the 21st Jan, 2008


Gold medal for your efforts fon an exhausting Olympic photography day!

Seconded. The motion is carried by a vote of two to zero.

It was a tough day for me too, but I was at least able to get 3 hours sleep last night...

brownie-ll

brownie-ll said on the 21st Jan, 2008

Props for the quick yet detailed review that's got me hyped up for the Melbourne version.

NiteShok

NiteShok said on the 21st Jan, 2008


My god, I had forgotten about this. I was so appalled by this. I just could not believe that someone in charge could let that happen. And not just at the start, as you've said, it occurred THROUGHOUT THE WHOLE SET. Way to not give one of the most influential and innovative guitarists of my generation the spotlight he so rightly deserves. Jesus christ, what a cock-up.

sarahanne

sarahanne said on the 21st Jan, 2008

great review Liam!

Im so glad you mentioned that bout spoon. I was really really dissapointed with how they translated at the festival. I could deal with their "not so crowd pleaseing set"...but there was just no energy..

and Im a huge fan...

Demosthenes

Demosthenes said on the 21st Jan, 2008



Bjork copy ought to be with Cec right now, DP, so it's outta my hands.

gumbuoy

gumbuoy said on the 21st Jan, 2008

great review Liam!

Im so glad you mentioned that bout spoon. I was really really dissapointed with how they translated at the festival. I could deal with their "not so crowd pleaseing set"...but there was just no energy..

and Im a huge fan...

yeah im generally a fan too, but i found them disappointing, i was also disappointed when i saw them live for the first time, last time they toured. it was a house show, so maybe they just dont have that special stuff for me...

sarahanne

sarahanne said on the 22nd Jan, 2008

Also - did you see Tom Morello's cover of Dirty Deeds?? Was so wrong..lol.

gumbuoy

gumbuoy said on the 22nd Jan, 2008



I did not, I missed some of his set for Yves Klein Blue, but Demosthenes saw it and said it was fantastic, different strokes I guess...

sarahanne

sarahanne said on the 22nd Jan, 2008

hahaha. different strokes indeed.

gumbuoy

gumbuoy said on the 22nd Jan, 2008



i bet the crowd loved it though?

Joe Smiggens

Joe Smiggens said on the 22nd Jan, 2008



Don't get me started on the fucking D-Barrier. Last year was a joke (at least in Perth, where most events are fucked up by stupid planning). Fucking bouncer-regulated D gate. FUCK! If you weren't inside the D by 3pm, you weren't getting in. One of the best things about a festival is that you can get near a big stage, in front of a big act. The latest fucking system ruins any chances of that. I understand the point of dividing the crowd, but don't give the job to some moron fucking ape (who spends his time off from work breaking rocks with his head and can barely count to ten). Fucksake. It's the only reason I'm not going this year. I take no pleasure in watching bands from 2km away.

Second rant: Why the fuck didn't the Arcade Fire get to play later than Silverchair? Haven't The Chair just finished touring "the Great Divide" in headlining spot? Haven't they had their attention for the moment? I mean, they're OK, and are getting better, but they aint fantastic. First step to being a great band would be for young Daniel Johns to learn how to sing, surely?

gumbuoy

gumbuoy said on the 22nd Jan, 2008

Don't get me started on the fucking D-Barrier. Last year was a joke (at least in Perth, where most events are fucked up by stupid planning). Fucking bouncer-regulated D gate. FUCK! If you weren't inside the D by 3pm, you weren't getting in. One of the best things about a festival is that you can get near a big stage, in front of a big act. The latest fucking system ruins any chances of that. I understand the point of dividing the crowd, but don't give the job to some moron fucking ape (who spends his time off from work breaking rocks with his head and can barely count to ten). Fucksake. It's the only reason I'm not going this year. I take no pleasure in watching bands from 2km away.

Second rant: Why the fuck didn't the Arcade Fire get to play later than Silverchair? Haven't The Chair just finished touring "the Great Divide" in headlining spot? Haven't they had their attention for the moment? I mean, they're OK, and are getting better, but they aint fantastic. First step to being a great band would be for young Daniel Johns to learn how to sing, surely?

Re : Rant number 1 - i guess from the point of view of organisers, the D is doing its job, and thats the end of the conversation. They can only let people in once other people have left. It's a pain, but I can't think of a better way to restrict the number of people right up at the front in the crush. From what I can gather there is also a crush now at the outside edge of the D, maybe the main stages field might have to become allocated seating? :)

Re : Rant number 2 - at least they were late in the day, wtf were Anti-Flag doing on so early? I personally think Silverchair might have benefited from being either last or second last on the Green stage, where the packed in atmosphere could have generated them some sorely needed energy. Also, I think The Chair and The Finger spent the Great Divide tour alternating headlining spots? The Finger headlined the Brisbane show I went to.

Thommo

Thommo said on the 22nd Jan, 2008

Re : Rant number 1 - i guess from the point of view of organisers, the D is doing its job, and thats the end of the conversation. They can only let people in once other people have left. It's a pain, but I can't think of a better way to restrict the number of people right up at the front in the crush. From what I can gather there is also a crush now at the outside edge of the D, maybe the main stages field might have to become allocated seating? :)


thats the thing though,

the D barrier is currently doing its job but it is also causing ALOT more pain for people trying to get in.

quite simply there used to be 2 entrances to the D. Now there is one, so instead of half the people trying to get in at each side of the main stages now they are all in one place.

Im a big guy (6'6 100kg) and i got crushed quite badly in melb last year trying to get in for muse during the afternoon, (i think it was end of MCR) lets just say i would hate to be short and have to put up with that.

Joe Smiggens

Joe Smiggens said on the 22nd Jan, 2008



I know, but it sucks so badly. Ah remember the days when we could picnic in front of the second main stage and watch the first stage, then stand up and watch the next act. What's happening to people? Why are they so nuts? Perhaps sell less tickets? Perhaps alter the style of the lineup to include more quality bands and less fuck-off big budget acts that attract fuckheads looking for hit songs? Perhaps have more stages? If Splendour can do it, and Blues Fest, why cant BDO?




Whoops. My bad. Good point about Anti-Flag. I still reckon Arcade Fire would work even better with dusk or night.

gumbuoy

gumbuoy said on the 22nd Jan, 2008

I know, but it sucks so badly. Ah remember the days when we could picnic in front of the second main stage and watch the first stage, then stand up and watch the next act. What's happening to people? Why are they so nuts? Perhaps sell less tickets? Perhaps alter the style of the lineup to include more quality bands and less fuck-off big budget acts that attract fuckheads looking for hit songs? Perhaps have more stages? If Splendour can do it, and Blues Fest, why cant BDO?


Whoops. My bad. Good point about Anti-Flag. I still reckon Arcade Fire would work even better with dusk or night.

I think the last thing BDO needs is more stages. I was lucky this year, but every other year I've had terrible clashes. You see the list of bands, and you think how awesome it will be to see all those bands, and its not until the timetable comes out that you realise you can only see 1 in 6 of the acts, and there's clashes all over the place. This year because I was reviewing I didnt go and see anything from the dance tents, so I missed UNKLE (to see Silverchair no less) and Pnau, who I would have loved to see...

Less tickets would help, maybe just less acts full stop? On the other hand, that produces two problems.
1. Less tickets probably equals higher ticket price.
2. Back when I first started going, it was emptyish right through to mid afternoon, noone came for the early acts. Nowadays it fills up really early. So, if there were less acts, (say one less stage) it would presumably be the local acts that got cut from the bill, and therefore the big name acts would be on earlier, which would just bring people in even earlier than they are right now.

For this year's event, I preferred the acts on the green and essential stage, the main stages were just too big and too crazy.

I also kinda wish Splendour had stayed at just 2 stages. I hardly ever had any clashes, but the past two years with the 3 stages have provided some seriously heart breaking clashes...

And I agree 100% on Arcade Fire - I think to see them at dusk would have been nothing short of magical.

Johnny Deptran

Johnny Deptran said on the 22nd Jan, 2008

Well, Johnny, you're entitled to your opinion, although that opinion might carry more weight if it wasn't written like a tween discovering the internet for the first time.

As for "what so many of us are thinking", we weren't. The people who don't like Operator Please were off seeing someone else. Thats how festivals work.

This was an immature, childish act by one of the many drunken louts that give festivals a bad name. The only thing Amandah did wrong was give these jerks the attention they so richly did not deserve.
pull that broomstick out your arse mate, its rock and roll, not deportment school.
Gee you really nailed me with that "tween" comment, Im absolutely reeling!
Im guessing you were never captain of the debating team.

Napoleon Solo

Napoleon Solo said on the 22nd Jan, 2008



Thats great news for her because she has been wanting to have you for brunch for like, like, like ages. Sweetums!

Joe Smiggens

Joe Smiggens said on the 22nd Jan, 2008

Hmmm. It's the fairweather fans (as you refer to for Augie March) and young ignorant fucks that piss me off. I too am usually quite happy with the smaller stages. So, maybe keep the Eskimo Joes, Cat Empires, QOTSAs, Groove Armadas, Beautiful Girls, Limp Bizkits, and Foo Fighters and other big crowd pleasers on the big stages, and have more imported high quality bands (the type with a lengthy history of quality, and a long term fan base), yer Iggy Pops, yer Janes' Addictions, yer James's (why haven't they come?), yer Sonic Youths, to mix with the local acts on the smaller stages? I mean, I bet if it came down to it, the little shits (read: musical respect extends as far back as the last two JJJ hottest 100 albums) who say they cant wait to see Iggy Pop ("because he's like the original!") or Sonic Youth, wouldn't hesitate to skip it if there was a clash with the Scissor Sisters, The Killers, or My Chemical Romance. Good, leave us in peace.

Or perhaps they could just have a fuckheads BDO, and a non-fuckheads BDO. Who wants to be a judge?


I think the last thing BDO needs is more stages. I was lucky this year, but every other year I've had terrible clashes. You see the list of bands, and you think how awesome it will be to see all those bands, and its not until the timetable comes out that you realise you can only see 1 in 6 of the acts, and there's clashes all over the place. This year because I was reviewing I didnt go and see anything from the dance tents, so I missed UNKLE (to see Silverchair no less) and Pnau, who I would have loved to see...

Less tickets would help, maybe just less acts full stop? On the other hand, that produces two problems.
1. Less tickets probably equals higher ticket price.
2. Back when I first started going, it was emptyish right through to mid afternoon, noone came for the early acts. Nowadays it fills up really early. So, if there were less acts, (say one less stage) it would presumably be the local acts that got cut from the bill, and therefore the big name acts would be on earlier, which would just bring people in even earlier than they are right now.

For this year's event, I preferred the acts on the green and essential stage, the main stages were just too big and too crazy.

I also kinda wish Splendour had stayed at just 2 stages. I hardly ever had any clashes, but the past two years with the 3 stages have provided some seriously heart breaking clashes...

And I agree 100% on Arcade Fire - I think to see them at dusk would have been nothing short of magical.

rod1987

rod1987 said on the 22nd Jan, 2008

hey just wondering if anyone checked out karnivool cause they are usually great live?, also wondering did the the bogans camp out for ratm or just make a bolt for it when the chair were on. Fuck i cant wait for perths turn by then all the kinks will be ironed out.

antzpantz

antzpantz said on the 23rd Jan, 2008

Nice work there with reviewing and photos!

gumbuoy

gumbuoy said on the 23rd Jan, 2008



hey rod1987, unfortunately neither of us managed to catch Karnivool, much to our regret - theres only so much two people can do in a day, especially when one of them isnt officially there as a reviewer, and has agreed to contribute out of the kindness of his heart :)

as for the bogans "camping out" i'm afraid I couldnt tell you, I was so busy moving around I hardly got much time to look at what other people were doing, and by the time I arrived to RATM I was stuck pretty far back. I've heard there were lots of bogans inside, and at the outer edge of, the D, but how long they were there, I couldnt say.

rod1987

rod1987 said on the 23rd Jan, 2008

cheers mate are you working at all the bdo's or only the goldcoast

leni_t

leni_t said on the 23rd Jan, 2008



If you check out the photos there are a couple of Karnivool shots. I ran from Silverchair to catch the Karnivool set. I really enjoyed their set. Glad I decided to make the run over to that stage for it.

bullfrog23

bullfrog23 said on the 23rd Jan, 2008



Or perhaps they could just have a fuckheads BDO, and a non-fuckheads BDO. Who wants to be a judge?

I'll be the judge.

First Rule: if you're wearing fluro you're a fuckhead
Second Rule: if you're wearing fluro you're a fuckhead
anyone care to add to the list???

Joe Smiggens

Joe Smiggens said on the 23rd Jan, 2008

Anyone who can't handle their alcohol or drugs.

Demosthenes

Demosthenes said on the 23rd Jan, 2008

I'll be the judge.

First Rule: if you're wearing fluro you're a fuckhead
Second Rule: if you're wearing fluro you're a fuckhead
anyone care to add to the list???

"Southern Cross-wearing bogans, fluoro-wearing pill freaks and those pretentious scenesters who wear their pants at half-mast."

Kate from Iron On knows.

I think the internet ate my Bjork piece.

gumbuoy

gumbuoy said on the 23rd Jan, 2008



hey rod, much as id love to be flown around the country doing the reviews, im not sure my body could handle doing that many bands over and over again.

but I imagine the other BDOs will be being covered by local reviewers, which is probably for the best, since they have better knowledge of their local acts anyway...

kyza

kyza said on the 23rd Jan, 2008



My friend was in the D from Hilltop Hoods onwards, so yes the bogans camped out. VERY early on. The D was closed late afternoon I think

Demosthenes

Demosthenes said on the 23rd Jan, 2008



I was able to get in just as Regurgitator hit the stage. I left afterwards to go see Iron On, Billy Bragg and Battles, and when I returned during Silverchair, it was closed and there was a good few hundred people all squashed together like cattle waiting to get in.

I figured I might as well try my luck as well, seeing as Silverchair was (imho) faring pretty poorly, and there was a brief spot during Freak where they let in 50 or so people. The lights went red again after that though, and I threw in the towel at that point and wandered up to the edge of the second barrier. I looked around a few times to check on it, since I was pretty close, but it seemed to stay closed from then on.

brownie-ll

brownie-ll said on the 23rd Jan, 2008



T-Shirts with texta written slogans.

saimagizzle

saimagizzle said on the 23rd Jan, 2008

Gumbuoy: Great review, and massive props for the speedy delivery. You too Leni.

As for missing UNKLE, all I can say is, such a pity you did. I was standing up the back of the boiler room, then they started playing Chemistry to open, and BOOM! I was on the barrier 5mins later, and I didn't push. Loved it. Best set of the BDO. They nailed the crap out of their set.

NiteShok

NiteShok said on the 23rd Jan, 2008


I caught some of UNKLE's set and enjoyed it, then went to Karnivool to catch the last two songs (Themata and Roquefort). This was the fourth time I'd seen them so I wasn't really concentrating on the band; rather, just watching the crowd for their reactions. And man, they were loving it. Drew's guitar tone was the best I have ever heard it, seriously good stuff. Mad props to the sound team. The band were pretty much at the best I've heard them. I felt a strange twinge of jealousy/regret that a band I've listened to from their early days (2003, Persona EP) has become so massively popular and enjoyed. Then I got over it, and nodded my head to their songs.

sarahanne

sarahanne said on the 23rd Jan, 2008



Yeah def...well those who weren't angry about the fact they werent seeing Billy Bragg ;-)

It was interesting seeing him so stripped back though..

Demosthenes

Demosthenes said on the 24th Jan, 2008

Yeah def...well those who weren't angry about the fact they werent seeing Billy Bragg ;-)

It was interesting seeing him so stripped back though..

I was initially irritated by the switch, since it caused a Bragg-Iron On clash for me, but after a few songs, I discovered I was getting really pulled in by Morello's passion. By no means could he be described as a sophisticated advocate, but he speaks and sings with the passion of a believer. The man has an undeniable charisma.

Edit to add: the speaking in the third person thing was definitely odd, though. "The Nightwatchman is pleased!"

Personally I thought the DD cover was super, but strokes for folks for sure. :)

sarahanne

sarahanne said on the 24th Jan, 2008

Oh he is definately awesome to watch inthat respect.

Lol...I know. Anythird person talk...always creeps me out a bit. Its a bit "Kiss The Girls"...

MorningAfterboy

MorningAfterboy said on the 24th Jan, 2008

I'm seeing Bridezilla instead of Tom Morello, and now can't see Billy Bragg at all.
Oh well.

Who here besides Mark is Sydney BDO bound??

awhiteintights

awhiteintights said on the 24th Jan, 2008

Thats rubbish Paul Kelly was brilliant and he didn't even get a look in on this review. Did he get a review on any other articles?

awhiteintights

awhiteintights said on the 24th Jan, 2008

Thats rubbish Paul Kelly was brilliant and he didn't even get a look in on this review. Did he get a review on any other articles?

awhiteintights

awhiteintights said on the 24th Jan, 2008

Thats rubbish Paul Kelly was brilliant and he didn't even get a look in on this review. Did he get a review on any other articles?

Demosthenes

Demosthenes said on the 24th Jan, 2008



I think that Time Off was able to review Paul Kelly. They also had about three times the number of reviewers on the day.

disasterplan

disasterplan said on the 24th Jan, 2008

1. The D barrier isn't organised too well but despite all that, the debates its presence raises highlights the reason it was put in there in the first place: a bunch of dickheads think it's their god-given right to be as close as they want. Um, yeah that's what causes people to die in the first place.

2. The organisers may need to rethink their policy on headliners. Yes, Metallica, Tool or RATM will make sure every show sells out but do you really want a D-area packed pull of people who only want to see one band? For the past five years or so it's been as thought there've been two events going on - a festival and a Tool/Metallica/whoever concert... at the same venue.

3. Fair call on BDO not needing any more stages. As it is, there's too much for one day. There was a time I used to think the alternating stages thing was a great idea... but I'm not totally sold on it anymore. If you have 30-minute gaps between acts, you can stagger the start/finish times without having any overlap. The current setup means seeing someone in the Boiler Room, for example, means you potentially miss the bulk of two main stage acts (green and orange) and two secondary stage acts (green and essential). Do it the European way and you'd miss one on each.

I think it's mainly due to them going a bit overboard this year. There's an expression including the words 'bitten', 'chew' that comes to mind... and today's lineup reshuffle just highlights how stacked the lineup is.

kno80k

kno80k said on the 26th Jan, 2008

paul kelly? who gives a shit... bring on rage in melbs.

kno80k

kno80k said on the 26th Jan, 2008

paul kelly? who gives a shit... bring on rage in melbs.

Demosthenes

Demosthenes said on the 26th Jan, 2008



That sort of attitude isn't very nice, dude.

chuck stuff

chuck stuff said on the 27th Jan, 2008

What happened to the Bjork review?

edit: just read the whole thread. Sorry.

Demosthenes

Demosthenes said on the 27th Jan, 2008

What happened to the Bjork review?

edit: just read the whole thread. Sorry.

Check here [ http://www.fasterlouder.com.au/forum/showthread.php?t=12558 ] near the bottom of the thread.

grantee

grantee said on the 4th Feb, 2008

does anyone have a pdf or jpeg file of the 2005 line-up (preferably the Gold Coast one), and any other years previous to this? I'm just doing some personal photo slideshows and need these. just message me back and I'll give you my email. any help would be much appreciated. cheers!