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Image for Ticket Scalping: The State Of The Union

Ticket Scalping: The State OfThe Union

When Radiohead tickets went on sale on the morning of March 1, nobody expected them to last long. Even still, Ticketek and Ticketmaster exhausting their respective allocations in just under half-an-hour caused astonishment within the local music industry. What turned out to be more astonishing still, was how quickly those same tickets started appearing on eBay at greatly inflated prices: the dreaded scalpers had struck again, in some cases charging $1,299.00 for two tickets – five times the original retail price.

Within minutes fans were voicing their grievances via social media, and the same day Chugg Entertainment, who are handling the November tour, released a statement on Facebook promising to cancel any tickets identified as having breached the conditions of sale.

The whole episode has once again shone a light on ticket scalping. What was once the domain of sidewalk desperados has been given a dose of sophistication for the digital era, skilled resellers targeting the online sale of concert tickets, snapping up as many tickets as they can before flipping them for higher prices via online auction sites such as eBay. There’s little doubt the practice is becoming more popular.

It can be a lucrative exercise for those who play their cards carefully, but is it morally wrong? And if so, how much damage does it do and what’s the best way to tackle the problem? Many a reseller will tell you that they’re simply facilitating a floating market price for concert tickets: if this is the case, should that perhaps be done from the outset?

To find out, FasterLouder worked the address book. We spoke to two artists;Kimbra, who has just had her first experience with scalping in the United States and is now staring down the barrel of it happening again for her return Australian tour, and Jimmy Barnes, whose band Cold Chisel is pushing for Government legislation of the issue. We picked the minds of two industry representatives; Danny Rogers who heads up St Jerome's Laneway Festival and Chugg Entertainment's Managing Director Matthew Lazarus-Hall. And we also dug up a reseller: we wanted to know why he scalps concert tickets, how much it contributes to his income, and whether or not he considers it to be unethical. He asked for his surname to be withheld.

It’s an issue that simply won’t lie down, either, with Prince tickets going on sale on Monday morning – the initial Sydney and Melbourne shows selling out in four minutes and those same tickets once again quickly appearing on eBay.

Comments

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Oflick

Oflick said on the 20th Apr, 2012

That scalper, as well as being an arsehole, also seems to be under the absurd impression that more tickets exist because of scalpers. Perhaps I'm misunderstanding, but he seems to be saying "if I buy 50 tickets, that's 50 people who get to enjoy the show". You know, because those tickets would have vanished into thin air if he wasn't there to save them.

benjiswan

benjiswan said on the 20th Apr, 2012

i would also like to know about his margins and how he justifies them - a central point i think missed. also i would like to know how many, if any, of his scalped tickets don't get sold.

ragdoll

ragdoll said on the 20th Apr, 2012

scalpers are despicable, no matter how you slice it.

sarcasm_mister

sarcasm_mister said on the 20th Apr, 2012



the only sensible and reasonable thing the scalper said.

ebay, viagogo, gumtree etc etc don't seem to care much for it either. the same way legislation is starting to be brought in to combat the content on file sharing webiste, legislation needs to be brought in to control the content of these online auction sites. the idea of the internet being an anarchic haven should've died a long time ago. in saying that, legislation hasn't and probably never will wipe out illegal file sharing so similar action with scalping probably won't eliminate it either but it will make it much harder for those participating in it.

chickenman

chickenman said on the 20th Apr, 2012

correct ben how many don't get sold, also, that lady that recently cancelled cause of SNL and other things, people paid $560 a ticket, did they get a refund.

anyhows back to point.

I like to make money like the next guy, but I love live music and I like people to come along, so, I would never scalp a ticket, cause it is also creating a false economy, in a way. Like, would the gig or festival of sold out if scalpers weren't around. probably would. but it's a valid point.

Next, BDO, reckons they can't do splendours great idea, they could, they could open doors earlier and have a holding pen or something before main gates open. As for other events, qld seems the only winner atm cause everyone is getting a driver licence with a chip (good for over 18 events only) cause this would cut down the time on splendours idea.

I only give a couple of suggestions but something has to be done. 2 or 3 yrs ago, I went to buy BDO tickets at 1205am (midnite sale and got them), the next yr I was at work till late and didn't get home till 1220 am, guess what - sold out but 300 on ebay already. come on, how is this fair to anyone.

There has to be a general solution or idea somewhere and needs a massive focus group. Oh, the other dumb thing happening atm, was qld introduced a law, god knows if it is still in place but it only applied to certain venues, guess which one wasn't included BDO southport parklands was excluded on list. There is a answer and solution.

Bruce Dangerfield

Bruce Dangerfield said on the 20th Apr, 2012

in all of this the question should be who losses. the answer is the fans, who have to pay overs for their ticket or go without and the artist who lose an opportunity to engage with a fan. the promoters make their money, the ticketing agency make their money.so they do nothing.

promoters are in the position to combat scalping by stopping the use of third party ticket sales, and using the method that splendour in the grass use. names and address on tickets, and the only way you can change the name is for a resale back to the promoter, who can then on sell to another customer.

its easy enough to get information out about resale tickets through the use of social media. so every month annoucments could be made on the availability of resale tickets.

problem solved

berlinchair101

berlinchair101 said on the 20th Apr, 2012

To be fair, you never have to pay a scalper anything.

it sucks and if you missed out at the regular sale it means you missed out for good but you never have to pay exorbent prices.

I never have.

yetiite

yetiite said on the 20th Apr, 2012

Scalpers suck. But... Me and many friends have been able to attend festivals and shows because of scalpers. If you miss out on a Splendour ticket...you miss out. It sucks. I'd rather pay 700 then not have the option. I honestly think they should auction tickets to tours like radiohead, it'd raise prices, but probably not dramatically. I'd really like someone to explore that.

Dexter Ramone

Dexter Ramone said on the 20th Apr, 2012

Who was the dipshit in the FL forums that does this every now and then? Jetstarr?

shooteur

shooteur said on the 20th Apr, 2012

i like to think of it as a lazy tax myself. any spare tickets i've sold (or bought) online, for whatever reason, usually don't go until a week or two before the actual gig. ;)

hellboy1975

hellboy1975 said on the 20th Apr, 2012

i have no problems with people reselling tickets personally, even for an inflated price.

what i have an issue with is when the fans don't get an opportunity to buy tickets before the scalpers do. in my opinion, bands need to put their hands up and take more responsibility. they need to make sure that there are good pre-sales via their fan clubs before tickets go on sale to the public (and scalpers). unfortunately due to the way ticketing operators and venues work, this isn't always viable, but it would be nice to see more bands put more effort into this. pearl jam rarely seem to have a problem pulling it off.

the fans themselves need to take some responsibility as well. if someone misses out on the initial sale (pre-sale or otherwise) then personally i don't have much sympathy i can't think of a time when i've missed out on tickets when i've been ready to buy them once the go on sale. i've got lousy seats for sure, but never missed out altogether.

truthlies

truthlies said on the 20th Apr, 2012

The answers easy, I do this all the time and many sellest detest me - log into ebay and buy these tickets that are over priced and refuse to pay. Ebay hasn't got a system in place to make the buyer pay and all you get is an unpaid item strike. I still have my ebay account and I can still bid on items I actually intend on buying.
The anti-scalping army is here! You just gotta get online and start bidding!

Oflick

Oflick said on the 20th Apr, 2012

i have no problems with people reselling tickets personally, even for an inflated price.

what i have an issue with is when the fans don't get an opportunity to buy tickets before the scalpers do. in my opinion, bands need to put their hands up and take more responsibility. they need to make sure that there are good pre-sales via their fan clubs before tickets go on sale to the public (and scalpers). unfortunately due to the way ticketing operators and venues work, this isn't always viable, but it would be nice to see more bands put more effort into this. pearl jam rarely seem to have a problem pulling it off.

the fans themselves need to take some responsibility as well. if someone misses out on the initial sale (pre-sale or otherwise) then personally i don't have much sympathy i can't think of a time when i've missed out on tickets when i've been ready to buy them once the go on sale. i've got lousy seats for sure, but never missed out altogether.

I've missed out on tickets before, and usually it is my own fault (I didn't expect Faith No More's Sydney sideshow to sell out in minutes when it went on sale in 2009, so stupidly didn't bother to get someone to buy me one while I was at Tafe). But there are times when there are more people who want tickets than there are tickets, so obviously some people will miss out on tickets. I can deal with missing out on tickets. But I'd like to think the people who bought them want to go to the show, not scalpers. I wouldn't buy a ticket at an inflated price on ebay, but it's not right for people to buy tickets purely with the intention of scalping them for profit.

Of course, I have no problem with someone selling a ticket at cost price.

The answers easy, I do this all the time and many sellest detest me - log into ebay and buy these tickets that are over priced and refuse to pay. Ebay hasn't got a system in place to make the buyer pay and all you get is an unpaid item strike. I still have my ebay account and I can still bid on items I actually intend on buying.
The anti-scalping army is here! You just gotta get online and start bidding!

I have mixed feelings towards this. As much as I hate scalping, doing this means these tickets could go to waste and people who really want to go and are willing to pay won't get to. Unless the scalpers give up and put them on at cost price, in the short term it would just annoy more people. Then again, in the long term it could work to discourage scalpers.

I've contemplated doing this myself before, though.

truthlies

truthlies said on the 20th Apr, 2012

I have one issue - one or two POWER sellers have added a complete checkout before you secure them or someone else will buy - they also only accept paypal. But everyone else is fine. Best to do it a week or to before the event that way you maximize the potential that they will not be able to sell it.

I bid on dozens of tickets for the sw12 festival while they were over priced on ebay and was really stoked to see ppl outside the RNA showgrounds and lined up at the valley train stations trying to sell tickets for less than cost price. One guy bought one for $50. Serves you right! Thats what I say.

gumbuoy

gumbuoy said on the 20th Apr, 2012



If they paid using paypal they can get a refund. You just contest the charge and get paypal to reverse it.

absoluteDann

absoluteDann said on the 20th Apr, 2012

this has probably been the most interesting debate so far. i was surprised how little of the topic was given to sales online via ticketing websites, other than a few mentions of the sites crashing. i know that before it was common to buy tickets on websites, i never missed out. radiohead was the first time i have ever missed out on tickets. last time they were here, i bought them from an outlet without any problems. even now though when you go to outlets, their ticket systems will have the same problems as the website. maybe i am being too simple to suggest that if promoters want to ensure that they are only selling to fans, they should return to the days of only selling in person. sure, scalping existed, but as the scalper acknowledged, back then he was buying only one or two extra tickets, not ten or fifty.

stuieb84

stuieb84 said on the 20th Apr, 2012

this is an excellent article. great reporting once again fasterlouder. i think the initiative to have a trusted site that you can resell tickets only on face value is a great one, as it allows people to offload tickets from friends not going to the gig etc, and sell to people who want to go and not at inflated price. however i can't see the end of the ebay scalping occurring within the next three years without any regulatory and legislative measures implemented

stuieb84

stuieb84 said on the 20th Apr, 2012

this is an excellent article. great reporting once again fasterlouder. i think the initiative to have a trusted site that you can resell tickets only on face value is a great one, as it allows people to offload tickets from friends not going to the gig etc, and sell to people who want to go and not at inflated price. however i can't see the end of the ebay scalping occurring within the next three years without any regulatory and legislative measures implemented

Jestarrr

Jestarrr said on the 21st Apr, 2012



OK, I'll bite.

Yeah, I do it every now and then. It's a very easy moneymaking exercise. That said, I only do it for certain bands.

For example, I got chewed out for scalping tickets for a Lana Del Rey show. When she did that tour, she didn't exactly have any fans who had supported her for life. People were willing to pay $350 for pure hype. I was willing to oblige for that. It's not ethically wrong, they're either rich or they're stupid (I could never pay that), and it's their decision. It's not like the ticket was taken away from a lifelong fan or anything, it's just another person interested in her hype.

I did it for One Direction (I drove my shitty Peugoet into the dad's mansion past his Mercedes, he was happy to pay the $1100 for two tickets), and OFWG last year too.

Frankly, I don't care about the people who get stung by scalpers, they should try harder to get tickets if they really love the band. There aren't many times where getting tickets has been a challenge for me.
That said, it doesn't please me when bands with a substantial fan base miss out - like Radiohead or Prince. (Though like I said, if you couldn't get a Prince ticket with three shows in Melbourne, you aren't trying hard enough.)

Dexter Ramone

Dexter Ramone said on the 21st Apr, 2012

Thats incredibly retarded. Who are you to say what a real fan of a band is; and put a time limit on how long a fan needs to support the band before they've 'paid their dues'.

And even worse, why do you feel that you deserve to capitalize on the tickets, meaning it becomes only the rich can see their favourite band?

gumbuoy

gumbuoy said on the 21st Apr, 2012

OK, I'll bite.

Yeah, I do it every now and then. It's a very easy moneymaking exercise. That said, I only do it for certain bands.

So it's okay to mug rich people, not poor people? A crime is a crime, the "level" of the victim is irrelevant.



Are you fucking kidding me? They don't know any better, therefore ethically it's okay? What kind of "ethic" is that?

Seriously, douche, just GTFO.

Jestarrr

Jestarrr said on the 21st Apr, 2012

Thats incredibly retarded. Who are you to say what a real fan of a band is; and put a time limit on how long a fan needs to support the band before they've 'paid their dues'.

And even worse, why do you feel that you deserve to capitalize on the tickets, meaning it becomes only the rich can see their favourite band?

Well this retard has $1100 more in his bank account.

I never said there was a timeline either, we're talking about hyped acts here. I can say you aren't a real fan of the band if they've only got two songs released when tickets go on sale.

And because this is a capitalist economy, obviously. Once those tickets have sold out, it's demand and supply from there. I didn't suggest I 'deserve' to either, I just want to make a bit of money. Like the rest of the world.

Jestarrr

Jestarrr said on the 21st Apr, 2012

So it's okay to mug rich people, not poor people? A crime is a crime, the "level" of the victim is irrelevant.



Are you fucking kidding me? They don't know any better, therefore ethically it's okay? What kind of "ethic" is that?

Seriously, douche, just GTFO.

Firstly, how is this a 'crime'? You guys are morons.
Stores buy clothes for cheap, then sell for ridiculous margins as well. IS THAT ETHICALLY WRONG TOO?
This is how the world works.

(Now that Rusty's gone, I can't wait to embrace my title as most hated person on FL.)

Stefan Beck

Stefan Beck said on the 21st Apr, 2012

Jetstarr: Robin Hood of FL

Oflick

Oflick said on the 21st Apr, 2012


Frankly, I don't care about the people who get stung by scalpers, they should try harder to get tickets if they really love the band. There aren't many times where getting tickets has been a challenge for me.
That said, it doesn't please me when bands with a substantial fan base miss out - like Radiohead or Prince. (Though like I said, if you couldn't get a Prince ticket with three shows in Melbourne, you aren't trying hard enough.)

This is what bothers me. For a lot of big shows there are sometimes more people trying for tickets than there are tickets available. Obviously, some people will miss out. Everyone could try just as hard and some will miss out. You can't just say "they should try harder".

Firstly, how is this a 'crime'? You guys are morons.
Stores buy clothes for cheap, then sell for ridiculous margins as well. IS THAT ETHICALLY WRONG TOO?
This is how the world works.

You honestly can't see the difference between a store selling clothes for profit and you buying a ticket and scalping it?

sarcasm_mister

sarcasm_mister said on the 21st Apr, 2012

Firstly, how is this a 'crime'? You guys are morons.
Stores buy clothes for cheap, then sell for ridiculous margins as well. IS THAT ETHICALLY WRONG TOO?
This is how the world works.

(Now that Rusty's gone, I can't wait to embrace my title as most hated person on FL.)

http://premier.ticketek.com.au/content/buyers/termsofsale.aspx - point 8. they even put it in bold for fuckwits like you.

Stefan Beck

Stefan Beck said on the 21st Apr, 2012

Shouldn't we wait for Jetstarr to scalp tickets to something anyone here would actually want to go to before we cast judgement?

Are you guys really cut that you didn't get to see One Direction and Lana Del Rey?

Jestarrr

Jestarrr said on the 21st Apr, 2012



Man, they really enforce that!

Shouldn't we wait for Jetstarr to scalp tickets to something anyone here would actually want to go to before we cast judgement?

Are you guys really cut that you didn't get to see One Direction and Lana Del Rey?

Thank you. I actually stayed outside all damn night for those One Direction tickets too, so don't say I didn't earn them. (My little sister desperately wanted to go, so the other two tix were her birthday present. Needless to say, worth it.)

shazie

shazie said on the 21st Apr, 2012

In jestarrr's defense, didn't it take some time for those Lana del ray tickets to sell out? (I might be wrong, I can't remember) Id wager the people who were buying the tickets at that high of a price that late into the tickets going on sale weren't huge fans to begin with, just people who have a lot of money but didnt know her when the tickets went on sale.

Either way I'm not too fussed about scalpers, the vast majority go to actual people and it's only a small percentage that go to scalpers. surprise surprise, scalpers aren't the only people interested in going to radiohead.


Besides, I had a good experience with a scalper. I bought a ton of tickets in one go in 2009 and couldn't afford to get tickets to the editors concert for jan 2010. By the time I wanted to buy them, tickets sold out. One guy on eBay had it for about $20 above face value and I was happy to pay that bit extra so I could go (btw had an awesome time, fantastic live band). I know it doesn't compare to the huge markups, but hey it's good that I still had the chance to go. Obviously the tours for radiohead, prince etc etc are much higher, but you'd probably be able to find a ticket around cost price closer to the date.

People will always miss out on tickets, if you didn't get a ticket chances are some other person got it, not a scalper. I think scalpers who charge a little bit extra are fine. Call it a 'second chance price' if you will. The huge markups are different but those usually go down near the date of the concert.

sarcasm_mister

sarcasm_mister said on the 21st Apr, 2012



3mins from memory. i remember signing on quite casually thinking it would take a while to sell out. how wrong i was. it sold out moments after i bought my tickets.

RAMONESelaar

RAMONESelaar said on the 21st Apr, 2012

I don't mind scalpers too much for pretty much the same reason as shazie is saying. While it's a pain in the arse on those occasions when I miss out on tickets, it's good to know that there is that option there if I find myself really wanting to go to the concert/festival. I'm sure I'll have to do it for Splendour this year and I'll have to do it if I decide to go to Radiohead. I'd rather have an overpriced option than none at all.

shazie

shazie said on the 21st Apr, 2012



Oh yeah I definitely forgot then.

sarcasm_mister

sarcasm_mister said on the 22nd Apr, 2012

a lot of Record Store Day releases are already being sold on ebay for insanely inflated prices. do we hate those people as well?

RAMONESelaar

RAMONESelaar said on the 22nd Apr, 2012

Well it was inevitable that they'd be sold at high prices eventually. But seeing it this soon is fairly shit.

Oflick

Oflick said on the 22nd Apr, 2012

Yeah selling them this quickly isn't right. At some point in the future though it would have to become acceptable to sell them, though. It would be ridiculous for example to complain of people selling 50 year old comics or retro video games for incredibly inflated prices (unless they clearly aren't worth that).

prismelsert

prismelsert said on the 22nd Apr, 2012

one of lamest arguments one could ever imagine. cant wait for the day tickets will come with your name and these scumbags are out of business!

Jessabelle

Jessabelle said on the 22nd Apr, 2012

I don't understand why Matthew Lazarus-Hall thinks that the splendour method can't work with reserved seating events, surely the exact same thing happens - you present your ticket with seat number and your ID when entering and then you go to your seat - what are these "huge logistical issues"

batdan

batdan said on the 22nd Apr, 2012

bands should just play more shows so everyone can get tickets.

sarcasm_mister

sarcasm_mister said on the 22nd Apr, 2012

people arrive at Splendour over an entire day or more. at most concerts most people arrive within an hour or so. checking the ID of 15 000 people in such a short period of time is near impossible and will require a ton of staff. in others words a very costly process for no real financial gain.

truthlies

truthlies said on the 22nd Apr, 2012

I like ticket scalpers when they sell tickets less than cost price! I got my BDO Sydney for $100. I bought tickets to Interpol back in 2009 i think for like $40. Those were wins for me.
However, back in 2006 or 7 I bought a tool ticket at $400. My point is there are sometimes wins on ebay regarding ticket resales

craig123

craig123 said on the 22nd Apr, 2012



would be interested to know the splendour option available - given there is a resale facility wouldn't you wait for that if you were unlucky ?

craig123

craig123 said on the 22nd Apr, 2012



if there is a licenced section don't they do that already? and bag searches at the big concerts still occur right - time is being taken up with all these things already right ?

RAMONESelaar

RAMONESelaar said on the 22nd Apr, 2012



It'd depend entirely on whichever option gives me a better chance at getting a ticket or a better price. Previous experience with Soundwave resale has been pretty lacklustre - the organisers left it quite late and the buyers far outweighed the sellers, making it incredibly difficult; plus there were still people determined to charge more than what they paid.

In theory, I guess I'd prefer resale on the principle that scalpers are annoying more often than not. At this stage though it looks like I'll be getting a Splendour ticket through the presale, so hopefully I can go back to ignoring the scalping issue until later.

craig123

craig123 said on the 22nd Apr, 2012

yeah but comparing soundwave to Splendour is like comparing explosive diaorrehha to a mild stomach cramp in terms of organisation for resales.

That said in the past splendour resale is limited to what is available at the time, and they may do the transfer option again this year who knows.

Silver Surfer

Silver Surfer said on the 22nd Apr, 2012

'State of the Union'? Seriously guys, get your act together, that headline is quite weak.

We are not (yet) and official state of the USA so please use the more appropriate term 'State of the Nation'.

And the only way to stop the scalping is to use ticketing ID, which will of course have the problem of tripling the wait time to enter the venue.

Paul_Busch

Paul_Busch said on the 24th Apr, 2012

Scalping...it is like prostitution, it will always be with us. I missed out on tickets to Battle of Chlons featuring Attila with support by The Huns.
Only way I see around it is tighter control on Identification for certain concerts that we all know in advance will be over subscribed. We will never be able to address scalping for all events but we do need to start somewhere....but this is a conversation that has been going on for many, many years.

Braveheart81

Braveheart81 said on the 24th Apr, 2012

I personally think the scalping issue isn't as bad as everyone thinks it is.

If 1% of the tickets to a show are getting scalped, I really don't give a shit. Stuff sells out really quickly because the demand is huge. Whilst it is entirely true that a few more fans would have got tickets if there was zero scalping, the reality is that the overwhelming majority of people who missed out on tickets would still have missed out on tickets.

I think any of the options of limiting scalping have just as many drawbacks which make implementing them questionable.

Putting names and dates of birth on tickets adds costs to every ticket because ticketing companies need to implement the code and venues need more staff to let people in the door.

Having big onsales only available in person would be detrimental to so many punters who can't afford to commit the time to attend an outlet. It would also add to the cost of tickets because they would need more outlets and more staff employed to sell tickets. This would also be hugely unfair to regional people who don't have a Ticketek/Ticketmaster outlet within a reasonable distance of where they live. You can guarantee scalpers will be the first people in the queue because they have the most to gain from buying the maximum number of tickets and scalping them.

I think scalping is crap but I think it is just a fact of life. There is always a black market for any good where demand exceeds supply. I think this is something that people forget. They seem to think that tickets to gigs are something sacred but I don't want a system created whereby you have to jump through hoops and pay through the nose for a normal ticket to save the 1% of tickets that get scalped.

Also, Jetstarr's argument that scalping tickets to One Direction and Lana Del Rey because they are crap is the most retarded thing I've ever heard. Just because you think those concerts are stupid is irrelevant to whether it is ethical or not. By the same reason, a One Direction fan would be just as justified scalping tickets to Radiohead because they think they are indie hipster rubbish.

The fact that you sold tickets to some rich kid is also irrelevant. Just because he has the money to spend doesn't justify what you're doing in the slightest.

Paul_Busch

Paul_Busch said on the 24th Apr, 2012

Even arguing with the argument Jetstarr put up is a waste of oxygen....

Seaeagle1

Seaeagle1 said on the 25th Apr, 2012

there are a few issues here.
first you have the actual ticketing "official companies" and the promoters themselves.
problem 1. how many actual tickets for a venue go on sale to the public after promoter holds, vips, showbiz,preferred seating, pre-sales, gold clubs etc etc etc
sometimes less than 20% of the actual venue.

2. legislation doesnt work- we can see that in qld

3. if you help yourselves to a large ticket allocation, put 300-500 people in a room and give them a hot dog and a souvenier lanyard then whos the scalper now
suddenly a $99 ticket is $299(one direction)

4, the solution - legislation and regulation to the secondary market as in the united states - the reseller market is officially recognised and everyone must have a legitimate business entity with strict codes and regulations , fees etc this works.....

shazie

shazie said on the 25th Apr, 2012

there are a few issues here.
first you have the actual ticketing "official companies" and the promoters themselves.
problem 1. how many actual tickets for a venue go on sale to the public after promoter holds, vips, showbiz,preferred seating, pre-sales, gold clubs etc etc etc
sometimes less than 20% of the actual venue.



And where did you get these statistics?


Also, the obligatory simpsons clip for every post I make:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CpmDIP3Fn2Y

gumbuoy

gumbuoy said on the 26th Apr, 2012

and my obligatory Like for Shazie's simpsons post.

But seriously, seeagle1, where'd you get that stat, cos my guess is it's the other way round - vips, presales and clubs 20%, regular sales 80%

judgelord

judgelord said on the 29th Apr, 2012

you're complete scum if you scalp tickets, plain and simple!
if i have an extra ticket, i will sell it for the price that i bought it for, i'm not here to make a profit like those complete dogs out there. it is completely pathetic to steal the opportunity from the people who really want to see the band and get dogged by the scalp pricks!

krudboy

krudboy said on the 30th Apr, 2012

the technology exists to put a name, address, dob, even picture on a ticket. a la glastonbury/splendour. if they were serious about stopping scalping scumbags, the booking agents/ticketing agents/artist would enforce this. same with the credit card as ticket option. present card at entry, get ticket with seating number on it... not hard at all. how is that a logistical nightmare. its the exact same process that happens now, only in a different order.

why would the go to the effort though, they still get paid the same....

shazie

shazie said on the 30th Apr, 2012

The name on the ticket thing doesn't work if the venue staff don't cross-check the name. Every time I buy a ticket off Moshtix they just scan the barcode of the printout at without looking at my name.

Dexter Ramone

Dexter Ramone said on the 30th Apr, 2012

It takes a lot more manpower/time/money to check every ticket. Trust me. it's simply not the way to attack this issue.

Braveheart81

Braveheart81 said on the 30th Apr, 2012

Agreed.

It seems to me that one of the best methods available is to limit the amount of time before a gig that tickets are actually available. Sell them as far in advance as you want, but only send them out or make them available via .pdf a couple of weeks before the gig.

Maballes Aiken

Maballes Aiken said on the 30th Apr, 2012

i have noticed an increased use of bots by scalpers too, go on to ebay and you will find sellers who always have front row tickets, now either these scumbags have inside contacts at ticketek/ticketmaster or they are using bots, why aren't the agencies doing more to combat this ? if it's going to be a free for all then at least let everyone have an equal chance at getting tix. also, for gods sake, will the promoters please stop selling second rate tickets to companies like preferred seating who then mark them up by 100% because they can sell them before the general public sale, it's still scalping fucktards !

berlinchair101

berlinchair101 said on the 30th Apr, 2012

If the ticket companies are still making the money what is there incentive to stop it?

Braveheart81

Braveheart81 said on the 30th Apr, 2012



Surely this is why Ticketmaster have brought in Captcha.

I'd guess that more people are upset about them adding this than are relieved that they are trying to do something about bots.

Maballes Aiken

Maballes Aiken said on the 30th Apr, 2012

surely this is why ticketmaster have brought in captcha.

i'd guess that more people are upset about them adding this than are relieved that they are trying to do something about bots.

took me five minutes to find a web site selling the bot programs (cost about us$520) and they list a 90% accuracy with the captcha code

looks like these things just hammer the server, picking up blocks of tickets, the scalper then cherry picks the best tickets and proceeds directly to ebay

i came across this in the weekend when looking at a listing on ebay for ed sheeran tickets in melbourne (at this stage only a pre-sale had occurred so they had probably only sold about four front row tickets), anyways i check out this scumbags other listings and there are 65 other ticket listings and nearly all of them are front row, now either this piece of slime is the luckiest dickhead in the world or he bought one of these bots

now some of you will say, he's just an entrepeneur but to buy two tickets for this ed sheeran at a cost of about $150 and selling for $600 (see closed listings to find this douche) because he might have invested in a program which can outwit the ticketmaster server does not sit well with me

berlinchair101

berlinchair101 said on the 30th Apr, 2012

You know they will say they have front row tickets even if they don't have them, right?

They say things like 'Front section' or 'VIP' so dick heads buy them.

gumbuoy

gumbuoy said on the 30th Apr, 2012



I would say that depends on your definition of scalping. I would say that it's onselling tickets, for a profit, without the express permission of the original ticket seller (ie the promoter, or ticketek, or whoever).

Companies like that obviously have permission to resell at a profit, so at the very least they're in a different category from your standard scalper.

Braveheart81

Braveheart81 said on the 30th Apr, 2012

took me five minutes to find a web site selling the bot programs (cost about us$520) and they list a 90% accuracy with the captcha code

looks like these things just hammer the server, picking up blocks of tickets, the scalper then cherry picks the best tickets and proceeds directly to ebay

i came across this in the weekend when looking at a listing on ebay for ed sheeran tickets in melbourne (at this stage only a pre-sale had occurred so they had probably only sold about four front row tickets), anyways i check out this scumbags other listings and there are 65 other ticket listings and nearly all of them are front row, now either this piece of slime is the luckiest dickhead in the world or he bought one of these bots

now some of you will say, he's just an entrepeneur but to buy two tickets for this ed sheeran at a cost of about $150 and selling for $600 (see closed listings to find this douche) because he might have invested in a program which can outwit the ticketmaster server does not sit well with me

So basically another case of solutions to hinder scalpers having a greater detriment on regular punters.

Again, I think scalping is a fact of life. When demand exceeds supply there is always going to be a black or grey market.

The best way to stop scalping being such a problem would be for idiots to stop paying well over the odds for tickets on ebay. If you miss out on tickets, cop it on the chin and don't go to the show.

There is no magic bullet to stop scalping. People just need to accept that it will happen and it isn't as large a problem as they think it is. People miss out on tickets because events are popular and lots of people missed out on tickets. Not because a scalper bought the specific ticket you were going to buy.

PerthLIVE

PerthLIVE said on the 30th Apr, 2012

if noone is going to police it ie ebay, gumtree, scalpers will always get away with it.
and people need to be aware of the risks they take buying online from someone you don't know. the tickets may be forged, fakes, or even non-existant and that image you see is simply cut and pasted from someone else's listing.

if you want to shut down scalpers, here is the simple solution...don't buy from them. if they have no market to sell, they are holding a $150 piece of paper (ticket) that has no value to them - even better, $600 of credit card debt, (4 purchased tickets) for a price that noone is going to pay for.

true story: my cousin and i rocked up to the sold-out pearl jam 2006 gig at nib stadium, perth without tickets. (the sold out sign confirmed this). with a cardboard sign held aloft reading 'two tickets wanted', within 10 minutes we were approached by 5 different people asking prices $50 above face value ($125). use this to your advantage...inform the clown that you're not going to pay that, and the only reason he's here is because he could not sell the ticket online and ticketmaster / ticketek won't refund it. i also informed him we only had $100 each, so take it or spend the rest of the night trying to find a sucker.
the guy paused, cogs turned in his head and he said "ok". we got out two ticket 15 metres from the front of eddie vedder and cost that schmuck $50 for an absolutely amazing gig!!

the power is yours people. buy face value @ legitimate outlets or not at all.

longorange

longorange said on the 6th May, 2012

If you are dumb enough to miss out on tickets to a gig that's your fault. You deserve to pay exorbitant prices through scalpers.

In the past 12 months, I've attended every single gig and festival I've wanted to. I jump onto ticketek/ticketmaster 5 minutes before they go on sale. Refresh just before it ticks over and presto. I've never been unsuccessful. It's really not that hard.

People always whinge because the tickets "sell out too quickly". That's because you are probably incompetent. If you enter a captcha wrong, that's your fault, if you are shit at using the internet that's your fault. If you only entered into the Falls ballot once and have no friends, that's your fault. Buying tickets is a game, some people are better at it than others.

shazie

shazie said on the 6th May, 2012

If you are dumb enough to miss out on tickets to a gig that's your fault. You deserve to pay exorbitant prices through scalpers.

In the past 12 months, I've attended every single gig and festival I've wanted to. I jump onto ticketek/ticketmaster 5 minutes before they go on sale. Refresh just before it ticks over and presto. I've never been unsuccessful. It's really not that hard.

People always whinge because the tickets "sell out too quickly". That's because you are probably incompetent. If you enter a captcha wrong, that's your fault, if you are shit at using the internet that's your fault. If you only entered into the Falls ballot once and have no friends, that's your fault. Buying tickets is a game, some people are better at it than others.

This post is well on the way for most retarded post of the year.

RAMONESelaar

RAMONESelaar said on the 6th May, 2012

That really is phenomenally stupid.

CoolRusty

CoolRusty said on the 6th May, 2012

If you are dumb enough to miss out on tickets to a gig that's your fault. You deserve to pay exorbitant prices through scalpers.

In the past 12 months, I've attended every single gig and festival I've wanted to. I jump onto ticketek/ticketmaster 5 minutes before they go on sale. Refresh just before it ticks over and presto. I've never been unsuccessful. It's really not that hard.

People always whinge because the tickets "sell out too quickly". That's because you are probably incompetent. If you enter a captcha wrong, that's your fault, if you are shit at using the internet that's your fault. If you only entered into the Falls ballot once and have no friends, that's your fault. Buying tickets is a game, some people are better at it than others.

http://i573.photobucket.com/albums/ss174/conebone_2009/wtf-animated.gif

grattan

grattan said on the 7th May, 2012

From Gaslight Anthem's tumblr:

So we’ve been made aware of this current ticket issue about people having too high a limit per person, which scalpers take advantage of. We’re actually not the ones who set that limit, we have very little control over how retailers who sell the tickets do things. There was that big war Pearl Jam had a few years back, and that didn’t end up great.
Right now, we’re trying to come up with a system to let the people who want the pre orders of tickets to have a fair chance to get them at a fair price. But it has to be for real fans who actually want the tickets, not scalpers who buy them to sell to real fans. I don’t mean “real fans” as in if you only “kinda” like us you can’t get tickets. I mean real people who want to go to a show. So we’re gonna figure something out. I know for PJ there’s the Ten Club where I get my email about tickets before they go on sale to the general public and they’re usually discounted, which is cool. So maybe that’s an idea, but we need to figure out how to do that. Maybe we do the 11 Club.

shell_l_d

shell_l_d said on the 13th Nov, 2012

want to help stop ticket scalping & lobby for aus-wide anti-scalping legislation?
if yes, please sign share online petition on communityrun as shown in my profile.